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TV REVIEW: Supernatural’s “Mother’s Little Helper”

By on March 26, 2014
Pictured: Jensen Ackles as Dean -- Credit: Cate Cameron/The CW

Pictured: Jensen Ackles as Dean -- Credit: Cate Cameron/The CW

We’ve hit the beginning of the end.

Our beloved shows are about to pump out the last installments to their seasons, wrap up storylines, and take us on journeys that will lead us into the Fall.  Unfortunately for us we have to wait a few weeks here and there for new episodes.  That’s okay, though.  This week’s Supernatural gave us some good insight into where the final handful of episodes are heading and it just so happened that this episode was first time directed by my very favorite trench coat wearing angel, Misha Collins!

In a quaint town in Illinois a wife had returned home from the store.  However, the request of dinner from her husband sent her into a murderous rage.  Cue hunter party of one, Sam Winchester!

With Dean obsessed with finally tracking down Abaddon, it was up to Sam to solve the small town murder.  Drawing parallels from his own personal experiences, it seemed as if the increasing amount of incarcerated residents weren’t possessed by demons, but missing a key part of themselves that Sam had once lost: their souls.

Luckily for Sam his suspicions were proven true with the introduction of an older ex-nun named Julia.  Julia had met Henry Winchester and his pre-Abaddon possessed partner Josie in 1958, right before they were set to be welcomed into the Men of Letters.  The two had traveled to Julia’s convent to hunt a potential case involving the Knights of Hell.  Henry felt that getting out in the field and completing a hunt would only accelerate their knowledge of the otherworldly.

Pictured (L-R): Alaina Huffman as Josie Sands and Gil McKinney as Henry Winchester -- Credit: Cate Cameron/The CW

Pictured (L-R): Alaina Huffman as Josie Sands and Gil McKinney as Henry Winchester — Credit: Cate Cameron/The CW

Julia lamented to Sam that she had been kidnapped and watched as the demons, led by Abaddon, harvested the souls of humans.  Henry and Josie tried to expel the demons from their hosts, but Abaddon was too strong.  Abaddon knocked Henry unconscious, leading to Josie’s ultimate sacrifice.  Josie offered her body as a vessel, Abaddon obliging.  Julia painfully confessed to Sam that her greatest shame had been not telling Henry and the others what she had witnessed, which ultimately lead to the Men of Letters massacre, a burden she had kept with her all these years.

Sam deduced that the same events in 1958 may still be transpiring today.  A quick trip to the now abandoned convent proved his suspicions.  The same nuns who had once tried to kidnap Julia and the local townspeople were still holed up, using the convent like a factory to harvest souls for Abaddon.  The self entitled Queen of Hell was mining human souls in the convent and several other unknown locations to create a demon army, rendering any human bodies void and murderous.

Over on Dean’s end, the elder Winchester was having a rough time with his research.  Every minute he tried to concentrate only led him to flashbacks of holding the First Blade; the power he felt was intoxicating and he couldn’t shake the evident withdrawals.  In order to sooth his mind he headed to the local bar only to find his BFF Crowley had been watching him the entire time after an “accidental” butt dial from Dean sparked his curiosity.  Crowley’s presence wasn’t purely for quips and jabs, but to test Dean to see if he was truly loyal to the King of Hell (spoiler alert: he was).

After Sam’s release of the towns’ souls and Dean’s decision to get through his newly forming addiction alone, the brothers returned to the bunker to continue their search for Abaddon.

Although this episode was mundane in the action department, it did push the story forward if ever so slightly.  Misha’s directorial debut was a very welcomed addition to the information shedding hour.  Collin’s was able to keep up the pace and familiar tone of the series while introducing his own brand of Supernatural.  Castiel’s absence was missed once again, but knowing he was right behind the camera calling the shots was joyous.

How many sparkly, white souls did Abaddon now possess? What were Crowley’s intentions with Dean now that he knew the Winchester harbored a soft spot for the blood-thirsty demon? Will Castiel be jealous of Dean and Crowley’s best friendship?